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USDTL is now ISO/IEC 17025 Accredited

Showing: umbilical cord testing

22Sep

Dear Valued Client,

We are proud to announce that we are the first laboratory in the world to be ISO/IEC 17025 accredited for drug and alcohol testing in umbilical cord, fingernail, and toenail specimens.On September 4, 2015, USDTL attained ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation showing full compliance with the international testing standards. We have received our accreditation from ANSI-ASQ National Accreditation Board, demonstrating technical competence in the field of forensic testing. The scope of our ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation encompasses all specimen types and methods of analysis utilized in our laboratory.

Our laboratory has always maintained this level of quality and competency since our humble beginnings in 1991, bringing our clients the most responsive, personal service in the drug and alcohol testing industry. ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation reaffirms that commitment to our clients, for all aspects of our testing and client advocacy. You can always have absolute confidence that the results of every specimen tested by our laboratory will meet the highest of international standards.

ISO/IEC 17025 is the single most important standard applied to testing and calibration laboratories around the globe. Laboratories accredited to the ISO/IEC 17025 standard have demonstrated that they are technically competent and able to reproducibly generate accurate, precise and consistent data.

The practical benefits for clients of USDTL of ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation are seen on a continual basis:

  • Continuously produced testing results of the highest quality, validity, and integrity;
  • Improved customer communication and resolution of customer issues;
  • Continual improvement of our management system, with an emphasis on the responsibilities of senior management;
  • Fast resolution of laboratory issues regarding methods and equipment.
  • Evidential acceptance of USDTL laboratory results in virtually all jurisdictions.

To view our certificate of accreditation, visit us online at www.usdtl.com/wp-content/uploads/USDTL-ISO17025.pdf. If you have questions about ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation, please contact us at clientservices@usdtl.com or 800.235.2367.

Sincerely,

Adam Negrusz, Ph.D., F-ABFT
Laboratory Director

03Sep

NeoTox Vol 6 Iss 2

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20Apr

Neotox Vol 6 Iss 1

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13-Panel Toxicological Drug Screen of Umbilical Cord Tissues with Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays

30Oct

Ask a Toxicologist: Meconin

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Q: What is Meconin and why is it important in newborn toxicology?

A: Morphine is the predominant metabolite of heroin, but morphine is also a stand alone drug and a metabolite of codeine. Some mothers are provided morphine during delivery. Historically, there have been instances where heroin using moms could not be distinguished from moms given morphine during delivery. Meconin is a contaminating constituent from poppy that is present in heroin. Therefore, like Monoacetylmorphine – a metabolite of heroin, the presence of Meconin indicates the use of heroin and when found in umbilical cord tissue indicates fetal exposure to heroin.

USDTL screens for Meconin in umbilical cord. 
Click here to find out more about our testing services

09Nov

The Fetus & Newborn: State-of-the-Art Care

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Bob Demaree, Clinical Projects Manager at USDTL is at The Fetus & Newborn: State-of-the-Art Care conference in Las Vegas, NV this week. He welcomes every attendee to stop by and learn more about our newborn testing. More importantly our newest assay which can measure an alcohol biomarker in umbilical cord tissue.

Fetal alcohol exposure has been recognized as the leading cause of preventable mental retardation and birth defects. Each year in the United States approximately 40,000 alcohol exposed newborns are diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. This condition can result in a variety of physical, behavioral and learning disorders. A recent SAMHSA survey reviewing data collected in 2009-2010 reported that 4.7 percent of pregnant women admitted binge or heavy drinking. Early identification is a key factor to improving outcomes for this group. Currently, identification relies on maternal 
self-report or the presence of a set of unique physical characteristics. Self-report has limited value in determining alcohol exposure and the physical characteristics may not appear until later in child’s development.

A positive result from our CordStat EtOH is an indication of risky alcohol drinking behavior in the last two to four weeks of pregnancy.

To find out more call customer serivce at 800.235.2367.

07Nov

Ask the President

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Q: How long do I have to dispute a result?

A: USDTL saves negative specimens for seven days after initial accessioning. Seven days is longer than the customary three days that most labs retain negatives. This duration should allow clients a reasonable time to decide if dispute resolution is needed, to contact customer service and initiate the process. Positive specimens are stored frozen for one year following accessioning. Our Client Services Representatives will provide you with the necessary paperwork for you to sign and return to initiate the re-test process. Once the paperwork is in order, Client Services will return a re-test result to you in one to two working days. If you have any questions after receiving the results, please contact Client Services and they will either assist you or direct you to one of our forensic toxicologists to discuss the case with you.

Got a question for USDTL? Ask President and Scientific Director Douglas Lewis. E-mail nancy.parra@usdtl.com with your questions, and you may be featured in our newsletter!

07Oct

Two days after the press release announcing our new CordStat EtOH assay, USDTL serves it’s first client testing umbilical cord for alcohol biomarkers. Welcome CordStat EtOH customers:


Kendyll received the order. 


Specimen custodian, Senovia pulled the sample


Justin ran the first CordStat EtOH batch


Kyla accessioned the specimen.


Rosie reviewed and posted the result.


The lab partied.


Celebration ensued.