Urine Resources

Urine Resources


To view the Urine Testing Panels and Collection Instructions, click here.


Urine Videos

CCDG Presentation

Direct Alcohol Biomarkers - EtG and PEth Webinar

Direct Biomarkers of Alcohol Use by Dr. Adam Negrusz

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Urine Infographics

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Urine Articles

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USDTL Urine Research

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Urine Poster Presentations

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USDTL Assisted Urine Research

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Foundational Urine Research

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Urine White Papers

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Urine Announcements

Laboratory Improves Propofol Testing Following New Research Data Laboratory Improves Propofol Testing Following New Research Data

05-Jul-2013

New data from researchers at USDTL shows that propofol use can be detected in urine samples for as long as 28 days following low-dose anesthesia.

Report Change Notification Report Change Notification

18-Apr-2016

Effective July 18, 2016, USDTL will be implementing a new way of reporting quantitative results. In order to satisfy accreditation requirement, the concentrations of drugs exceeding the Upper Limit of Quantification (ULOQ) for any given drug will be reported as > ULOQ (greater than ULOQ). The ULOQ will be provided.

Quantity Not Sufficient (QNS) Explained Quantity Not Sufficient (QNS) Explained

02-Mar-2016

Quantity Not Sufficient (QNS) is a result of not having a sufficient quantity (volume) of
specimen to test for the panels ordered. The amount of specimen required for collection
is directly related to the amount of specimen needed to screen and confirm for the panels we offer. The initial screening uses a portion of the original specimen and the confirmation testing uses another portion of the original specimen. To forensically confirm positives, means running a new test, with a new portion of the original specimen, using a different analytical technique.

Antihistamines and OTC Amphetamines to be Discontinued in Urine Antihistamines and OTC Amphetamines to be Discontinued in Urine

01-Feb-2016

We are writing to notify our clients that effective February 1, 2016, we will no longer be testing urine for antihistamines and OTC amphetamines. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Cutoffs for Antihistamine Drugs in Urine Lowered Cutoffs for Antihistamine Drugs in Urine Lowered

3-Aug-2015

I am pleased to inform you that USDTL has succeeded in improving our urine assay for antihistamine drugs by reducing the cutoff from 500 ng/mL to 100 ng/mL. The improved urine assay for antihistamine drugs will be available starting August 3, 2015.

Updated Policy Regarding Insufficient Specimen Volumes Updated Collection Instructions Updated Policy Regarding Insufficient Specimen Volumes Updated Collection Instructions

1-Apr-2015

It is our first priority to deliver testing results that provide the most valuable information possible for your substance abuse testing needs. To better accomplish this duty to our clients, we are updating our policy concerning specimens that do not have sufficient volume for both preliminary testing and confirmation. Effective April 1, 2015, confirmatory tests that cannot be completed due to insufficient specimen volume will be canceled on an individual drug class and/or analyte basis. We will report confirmation results for each test for which there is sufficient volume of specimen available, giving you access to more information.

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Urine FAQs

*Click the green and white plus sign beside each question to view the answer.

How do PEth results differ from Urine EtG/EtS results?

Recent studies have indicated that low-level positive EtG results can be produced by certain agents like hand sanitizers and mouth wash. The PEth blood assay is an ideal tool to define low-level positive EtG results. The volume of alcohol required to trigger a positive PEth result is far above the level available from incidental exposure.

How much is needed for an adequate urine sample?

Requested sample volume is 10 milliliters.

Q: Why are both ethyl sulfate (EtS) and ethyl glucuronide (EtG) included in urine testing for alcohol use, but only EtG in fingernail or hair testing?

A: For urine testing, it is standard practice in the field of toxicology to include both EtS and EtG, because EtG is subject to bacterial production and degradation if a urine sample is contaminated (e.g. when the donor has a urinary tract infection). EtS is not subject to bacterial production or degradation, and provides a second, more reliable alcohol biomarker in these urine contamination scenarios. Other specimens types, such as fingernails and hair, do not have this issue, so only EtG is measured in those sample types.

What is the detection window for urine?

A sample of urine provides a drug history from the last two to three days for most drugs, and an even longer period for marijuana.

Why was one matrix positive and another negative on the same donor?

Different sample matrices have different detection time frames. The result of any second collected specimen has no bearing on the validity of a first collected specimen. For example, a hair sample with a three month window of detection might test positive for a particular substance, while a urine sample from the same donor, with a 2-3 day window of detection, might test negative. In this case, the donor has used that substance within the past three months, but may not have used it within the most recent three days.

Will a UTI affect the result of drug and/or alcohol testing?

Certain bacteria may interfere with drug detection but will not generate a false positive. Fermenting bacteria in the presence of excess glucose may produce ethanol in the bladder and in the specimen cup.

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