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11Nov

Substance Vol 7 Iss 3

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23May

Shifting Landscape

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By Joseph Salerno

The need for opiate and drug testing has grown in the last three decades. 2.4 million people in the United States abused opioid pain relievers in 1985, the year before President Ronald Reagan announced his Federal Drug-Free Workplace Program.1 That number swelled to 4.9 million - a 104% increase - by 2012.2 During that same time, the population of the United States grew only 32%.

The original opiate testing panel created in 1986 is an incomplete tool for today's drug testing needs. No other category of drugs has evolved as much as opiates and opioids. Addiction to high strength pain relievers and newer opioid compounds has eclipsed codeine, morphine, and heroin addiction addressed by the original 1986 five-panel drug test.

Based on the most recent data on emergency department visits related to illicit substance abuse, it is clear that opiate and opioid abuse has shifted dramatically. Screening for opiate abuse using only 1986 drug testing guidelines for the opiate drug class misses the past 30 years of pharmaceutical and drug testing advancements.3

References:

1. United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse. National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, 1985. ICPSR06844-v3. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2013-06-19.

2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings, NSDUH Series H-46, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 13-4795. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2013.

3. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Drug Abuse Warning Network, 2011: National Estimates of Drug-Related Emergency Department Visits. HHS Publication No. (SMA) 13-4760 Series D-39. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Admin., 2013.

27Oct

The Hazards of Heroin Use

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Take a leadership role in drug prevention for our youth. We are proud to participate in Red Ribbon Week, 10/23-10/31.  Visit redribbon.org and share their message on social media. Don't forget to tag them so the message will spread! @redribbonweek #RedRibbonWeek

06Nov

Q: Is there a test that can differentiate between fetal exposure to heroine and fetal exposure to morphine during the birthing process?

A: Yes. The umbilical cord from a baby whose mother was administered morphine during delivery will only be positive for morphine. The umbilical cord of a baby that is positive for Meconin and/or Monoacetylemorphine in addition to morphine is indicative of heroine exposure. 

Knowing the difference can help doctors and nurses provide a better outcome for baby's treatment plan.

USDTL now offers a sensitive test for Meconin which is helpful in determining exposure to heroin. Visitwww.USDTL.com - testing services for information on umbilical cord testing or contact client services at 800-235-2367.

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